Causes of Fires in U.S.

 

fire

Fire at Nonresidential

Cooking 29.1%
Unintentional, careless 10.0%
Heating 9.0%
Intentional 8.9%
Electrical malfunction 8.1%
Open flame 6.1%
Other heat 5.1%
Appliances 4.9%
Other equipment 4.7%
Exposure 4.4%
Natural 3.4%
Equipment malfunction 2.5%
Smoking 2.1%
Cause under investigation 1.6%
Playing with heat source 0.4%

Total does not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

Fire estimate summaries of nonresidential buildings, fire trends and causes (2005-2014)

 

Property types

“Residential” is the leading property type for fire deaths (76.5%), fire injuries (78.0%) and fire dollar loss (55.0%).

Fire Estimate Summaries present basic data
on the size and status of the fire problem in the
United States as depicted through data reported
to the U.S. Fire Administration’s (USFA’s) National
Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS). Each
Fire Estimate Summary addresses the size of the
specific fire or fire-related issue and highlights
important trends in the data. Note: Fire Estimate
Summaries are based on the USFA’s “National
Estimates Methodology for Building Fires and
Losses” (http://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/
pdf/statistics/national_estimate_methodology.
pdf). The USFA is committed to providing the best
and most currently available information on the U.S.
fire problem and, as a result, continually examines its
data and methodology. Because of this commitment,
changes to data collection strategies and estimate
methodologies occur, causing estimates to change
slightly over time. Previous estimates on specific
issues (or similar issues) may have been a result of
different methodologies or data definitions used and
may not be directly comparable to current estimates

Fires at home:

Cooking 50.0%
Heating 12.5%
Electrical malfunction 6.3%
Unintentional, careless 5.8%
Open flame 4.4%
Appliances 4.2%
Intentional 4.2%
Other heat 3.2%
Exposure 2.0%
Smoking 2.0%
Natural 1.6%
Cause under investigation 1.2%
Other equipment 1.2%
Equipment malfunction 0.9%
Playing with heat source 0.4%

Total does not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Fires by general property type (2013)

 

31.7% Residential

8.6% Nonresidential

14.5% Vehicle

39.3% Outside

5.9% Other

fire

CCTV Systems Guide for Business

CCTV or (closed-circuit television)

 

CCTV firequenchCCTV is a system that sends television signals to a limited number of screens, and is often used in shops and public places to prevent crime. You see them around basically everywhere, cameras in corners, roofs, stoplights, different sizes, shapes. I use to manage a  pizza place  in Union city NJ. After some days in, I asked the owner were was the system of the camera that was upfront, He smirk and said it was fake, that didn’t work. It was surprising for me, why an owner would not want to monitor his place?

A growing branch in CCTV is internet protocol cameras (IP cameras). It is estimated that 2014 was the first year that IP cameras outsold analog cameras. IPcameras use the Internet Protocol (IP) used by most Local Area Networks (LANs) to transmit video across data networks in digital form.

Are you going to wait to be robbed to place a cctv system? that is not all, false claims happen all the time and can be worse than a small rob. a good CCTV system will protect you from all this and more!firequench security nyc

 

 

 

 

 

Why do you need CCTV?

Internal loss:

Internal theft is a larger problem for most companies than they realize. Internal theft can be employee’s taking things as simple as office supplies to things that are extremely vital – such as customer records and other extremely valuable company files. Security cameras can help deter these activities, and allow you the ability to ‘go back and check’ if you sense there is a problem.

Robbery:

One thing is for sure: No criminal wants to be seen. Criminals do not want to take any chances that people will see them in their act of illegal activity. If a criminal sees cameras on your building chances are they will be deterred from carrying out their criminal activity around your property. You don’t wish any bad luck upon your neighbors, but it’s better that their building or vehicles get vandalized than yours, and security cameras can create that needed deterrence that sends the criminals next door.

Quality control:

Recently, we were approached by a food manufacturer who had problems with their quality assurance. Their retailers were complaining that they received boxes of products that were empty, or lacked the quantity of product promised. To curtail this problem the food manufacturing company installed security cameras on their production and packaging lines. All of the boxes the company ships have date and time codes stamped on the outer box. The date codes gave the food manufacturer the ability to review the recorded video at certain dates and times. The security cameras helped the food manufacturing company improve their packaging procedures – which helped them improve their reputation with retailers.

False Claims:

Slip and fall, sexual harassment, bad customer service – all things that can cost a company a lot of money and damage the company’s reputation. Security cameras can assist with all of these areas. Properly placed security cameras can help a company verify if a ‘slip and fall’ was real and caused by employee negligence, or if a person falsified the claim and slipped on their own accord. Security cameras can help with sexual harassment claims and can help you identify if one of your employees actually provided bad customer service, or if a customer was just having a bad day

Peace of mind:

Peace of mind, in most cases, trumps all of the good reasons we have offered to have security cameras. Sometimes you’ll just get a feeling that something is not right at the office. Security cameras give you the ability to ‘look in’ on your office and the areas surrounding your building from your home computer or smart phone – and seeing with your own eyes that everything is OK can provide you with great peace of mind.cctv-1144371_640

 

Avoid AUDIO recording! Could be considered wiretapping and have to be regulated and could backfire.

Types of Fire Extinguishers

Portable Extinguishers

firequench Extinguishers

Carbon Dioxide

Carbon Dioxide fire extinguishers extinguish fire by taking away the oxygen element of the fire triangle and also be removing the heat with a very cold discharge.

Carbon dioxide can be used on Class B & C fires. They are usually ineffective on Class A fires.

 

Water and Foam

Water and Foam fire extinguishers extinguish the fire by taking away the heat element of the fire triangle. Foam agents also separate the oxygen element from the other elements.

Water extinguishers are for Class A fires only – they should not be used on Class B or C fires. The discharge stream could spread the flammable liquid in a Class B fire or could create a shock hazard on a Class C fire.

Cartridge Operated Dry Chemicalfire extinguishers firequench

Cartridge Operated Dry Chemical fire extinguishers extinguish the fire primarily by interrupting the chemical reaction of the fire triangle.

Like the stored pressure dry chemical extinguishers, the multipurpose dry chemical is effective on Class A, B, and C fires. This agent also works by creating a barrier between the oxygen element and the fuel element on Class A fires.

Ordinary dry chemical is for Class B & C fires only. It is important to use the correct extinguisher for the type of fuel! Using the incorrect agent can allow the fire to re-ignite after apparently being extinguished successfully.

Water Mist

Water Mist extinguishers are a recent development that extinguish the fire by taking away the heat element of the fire triangle. They are an alternative to the clean agent extinguishers where contamination is a concern.

Water mist extinguishers are primarily for Class A fires, although they are safe for use on Class C fires as well.

Dry Powder

Dry Powder extinguishers are similar to dry chemical except that they extinguish the fire by separating the fuel from the oxygen element or by removing the heat element of the fire triangle.

However, dry powder extinguishers are for Class D or combustible metal fires, only. They are ineffective on all other classes of fires.

Call us for detailed information for your business or home!

Clean Agent

Halogenated or Clean Agent extinguishers include the halon agents as well as the newer and less ozone depleting halocarbon agents. They extinguish the fire by interrupting the chemical reaction of the fire triangle.

Clean agent extinguishers are primarily for Class B & C fires. Some larger clean agent extinguishers can be used on Class A, B, and C fires.

Wet Chemical

Wet Chemical is a new agent that extinguishes the fire by removing the heat of the fire triangle and prevents re-ignition by creating a barrier between the oxygen and fuel elements.

Wet chemical of Class K extinguishers were developed for modern, high efficiency deep fat fryers in commercial cooking operations. Some may also be used on Class A fires in commercial kitchens.

Dry Chemical

Dry Chemical fire extinguishers extinguish the fire primarily by interrupting the chemical reaction of the fire triangle.

Today’s most widely used type of fire extinguisher is the multipurpose dry chemical that is effective on Class A, B, and C fires. This agent also works by creating a barrier between the oxygen element and the fuel element on Class A fires.

Ordinary dry chemical is for Class B & C fires only. It is important to use the correct extinguisher for the type of fuel! Using the incorrect agent can allow the fire to re-ignite after apparently being extinguished successfully.

fire security